Health

Road cycling is a fantastic way to help maintain your overall health. And proper nutrition, both on and off the bike, is a necessary component. Understanding how to avoid injuries, recover from injuries, eat and drink right to fuel your riding, choosing equipment properly, proper bike fit – all of these and more are important success factors in road cyling.

Are Perfect Pedal Strokes Worth Cultivating?

Because we often associate smooth pedaling with accomplished cyclists, many roadies develop a fetish for perfect circles. They work for hours on their pedal stroke, trying to pull the foot up on the backstroke so it doesn't weigh on the descending foot's powerful push downward. But there's compelling evidence that a smooth pedal stroke may not be as important as we thought. Coach Fred Matheny discusses whether it's worth cultivating the perfect pedal stroke.

Must Have RBR Membership

Write comment (0 Comments)

Cycling Sports Medicine Tips from an Expert

Andy Pruitt’s name has become synonymous with sports medicine for cycling. As director of the Boulder Center for Sports Medicine in Boulder, Colorado, Pruitt has made a career out of treating world-class riders. He has served as chief medical officer for the U.S. Olympic Cycling Team and is an elite athlete in his own right, too. He lost his lower leg in a hunting accident at age 14 but still wrestled and participated in track, eventually winning 12 high school varsity letters. When he took up cycling he earned a category 2 ranking in able-bodied racing and was twice a world champion in disabled cycling. We've got a sampling of Pruitt's cycling wisdom.

Read Full Story

Write comment (0 Comments)
Write comment (0 Comments)

Bicycles Are Most Energy-Efficient

If you ride a bicycle, be proud. Humans riding on bicycles are more energy-efficient than any other animal and any other form of transportation. Vance Tucker of Duke University compared bicyclists to humans and animals running, birds flying and fish swimming, as well as to people in motor-powered cars, boats, trains and planes (J. Exp. Bio, 1973;68(9):689-709). The less energy per weight you use to travel over a distance, the more energy-efficient you are. Tucker found that the most efficient creature without mechanical help is a condor. With mechanical help, the cyclist comes out on top.

Read Full Story

Write comment (1 Comment)
Write comment (0 Comments)
Write comment (0 Comments)

Crankarm Study Says Length Doesn't Matter

Have you ever wondered why bicycles come with a relatively narrow range of crankarm lengths? Most cranks commercially available range from 165 to 175 mm. This 1 cm span equals about 1/3 inch yet is supposed to fit riders from under 5 feet tall to well over 6 feet. Very tall cyclists can buy 180-mm cranks from a few companies, but that's generally the upper limit without an investment in custom production. But some studies say crankarm length really doesn't matter.

Must Have RBR Membership

Write comment (0 Comments)

The Search for the Ultimate Saddle

It could be argued that the search for the ultimate saddle design is the Holy Grail of cycling research, considering that almost every rider suffers pressure, chafing and even saddle sores at some time during his or her career. There's a reason why most experienced riders have a box of old saddles in the garage, discarded in the ongoing search for a comfortable seat. Coach Fred Matheny discusses the search for utlimate saddle.

Read Full Story

Write comment (0 Comments)

Sexual Function and Noseless Saddles

The following is based on a review of the literature on cycling and sexual dysfunction discussed in a NIOSH study showing a high rate of erectile trouble in bicycle police officers. On the basis of that study, a recommendation was made that riding a noseless saddle is the cure to erectile dysfunction among bike riders. Read why the research recommendations are flawed.

Must Have RBR Membership

Write comment (0 Comments)

A Counter Point to Coach Fred Matheny's Commentary on Noseless Saddles

One of the frustrations to the scientific community is individuals who have no understanding of biostatistics, experimental design, population dynamics and scientific methods to have an "ah ha" moment that a study is wrong because some fact they know about the topic. Read what this researcher counters to our article Sexual Function and Noseless Saddles Sexual Function and Noseless Saddles.

Must Have RBR Membership

Write comment (0 Comments)

A Cadaver Tries to Kill the Concept of Floating Pedals

There can be a conflict between results of lab studies versus real-world experience. Often, the researchers conclude one thing while clinicians and coaches find the opposite to be true. This conflict between scientific conclusions and a real cyclist's performance on the road was clearly shown in a series of biomechanical studies undertaken from the Biomedical Engineering Department at the University of California at Davis where they used a machine that could rotate the tibia of a cadaver knee while simultaneously pulling on various muscles and tendons to simulate the pedal stroke.  Read on to learn how a cadaver tries to kill some conceptions about cycling-related injures.

Must Have RBR Membership

Write comment (0 Comments)

Why Weight Training Is Vital for Aging Cyclists

Of course, training is the key to increasing power. Many dedicated cyclists use power meters to accurately record their wattage output during interval training. Then they use sophisticated software to help them analyze the results and plan subsequent workouts. Although intense training helps the body produce more power, eventually the curve of improvement flattens. Coach Fred Matheny discusses why weight training is vital for aging cyclists.

Read Full Story

Write comment (0 Comments)

The Latest VIDEOS & PODCASTS (check main navigation Categories at top of page for more videos)